6.3 Political Systems and Their Legitimacy

This page is part of the Repository Contents Listing

6.3.1      Authoritarianism

6.3.1.1   Partially Authoritarian Governments
6.3.1.2   One-Party States
6.3.1.3   Dictatorships
6.3.1.4   Monarchies
6.3.1.5   Establishing, and Maintaining, Law and Order
6.3.1.6   Suppression of Freedom by Authoritarian Governments
6.3.1.7   Acceptability under Authoritarian Governments

6.3.2      Democracy

6.3.2.1   Forms of Democracy
6.3.2.2   The Range of Reasons for Voting
6.3.2.3   Party Manifestos
6.3.2.4   Systems of Voting
6.3.2.5   Populism in Democracies

6.3.3      Performance of Politicians

6.3.3.1   Responsiveness
6.3.3.2   Competence
6.3.3.3   Political Integrity
6.3.3.4   Focus on Serving the Public

6.3.4      Political Leaders

6.3.4.1   Leadership Responsibilities and Styles
6.3.4.2   Personality Politics
6.3.4.3   Limits to Time in Office
6.3.4.4   Selection of Leaders

6.3.5      Legitimacy of Political Systems

6.3.5.1   The Need for Political Legitimacy
6.3.5.2   Criteria for Assessing Political Legitimacy
6.3.5.3   Beetham’s 3-layer Model of Legitimacy
6.3.5.4   Evidence of Public Assent to Governance

6.3.6      Temporary Political Legitimacy Conferred by a Threat

6.3.7      Political Legitimacy as Measured by Human Rights

6.3.8      The Ideal Political System?

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